Tag Archives: Newman

Newman takes down Bentham and Kant

“Conscience is not a long-sighted selfishness, nor a desire to be consistent with oneself; but it is a messenger from Him, who, both in nature and in grace, speaks to us behind a veil, and teaches and rules us by … Continue reading

Posted in Conscience, Deontological Ethics, Immanuel Kant, Jeremy Bentham, John Henry Newman, Letter to the Duke of Norfolk, Utilitarianism | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Justification by Justification by Faith

In his Lectures on the Doctrine of Justification, Newman complains that, in practice, the Protestant doctrine of justification sola fide results in “substitut[ing] faith for Christ” (Genius of Newman, 188). That is, when the test of your salvation is your subjective awareness of … Continue reading

Posted in Experience, Faith, John Henry Newman, Justification, Paul, Paul Griffiths, St. Paul | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Logician’s Pyrrhic Victory

From Newman’s Grammar of Assent: Logical inference…will be found partly to succeed and partly to fail; succeeding so far as words can in fact be found for representing the countless varieties and subtleties of human thought, failing on account of the … Continue reading

Posted in Grammar of Assent, Inference, John Henry Newman, John O'Callaghan, Newman, Notions and Things, Thomist Realism and the Linguistic Turn | Tagged , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

The Threefold Office in Christ and the Church

It’s a classic thesis of Christian theology — especially dear to the Reformed tradition, but with appeal more broadly — that Christ fulfills a threefold office in his temporal mission, of prophet, priest, and king. Jesus sums up the three … Continue reading

Posted in Christology, Jesus, John Henry Newman, Munus Triplex, Prophetical Office of the Church, Threefold Office | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Humean Newman

In one of his Grammar of Assent‘s more famous lines, Newman remarks: “As to Logic, its chain of conclusions hangs loose at both ends; both the point from which the proof should start, and the points at which it should arrive, … Continue reading

Posted in Alvin Plantinga, Blaise Pascal, David Hume, Epistemology, Grammar of Assent, Grue, Induction, Inquiry Concerning Human Understanding, John Henry Newman, Logic, Nelson Goodman, Pascal | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The World of Scripture

A beautiful meditation of Newman on Scripture that could’ve come straight from Augustine: After all our diligence, to the end of our lives and to the end of the Church, [Scripture] must be an unexplored and unsubdued land, with heights and … Continue reading

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Changing to stay the same

A justly famous paragraph: It is indeed sometimes said that the stream is clearest near the spring. Whatever use may fairly be made of this image, it does not apply to the history of a philosophy or belief, which on … Continue reading

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