Tag Archives: Idealism

A Puzzle about Bodies

Say my body is that finite vantage from which I am available to the sensible world, and the sensible world to me. The puzzle is that this vantage seems not to be an extensionless point on the world’s horizon, but … Continue reading

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Newman as Transcendental Idealist?

Here’s a thought: what if Newman’s distinction in the Grammar between “notions” and “things” was basically akin to Kant’s distinction between sensibility and cognition? Kant said that intuitions without concepts are blind, and that concepts without intuitions are empty; Newman insisted … Continue reading

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Criticizing Aristotle on “substance”

Here’s a simplified criticism of the Aristotelian theory of substance. For Aristotle, a substance has three components: matter, form, and accidents, each playing a different explanatory role. Consider a tree. It’s one thing, but also a member of a particular natural … Continue reading

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Spinoza on Mind and Body

In part II of his Ethics, Spinoza offers some striking reflections on the mind’s relation to the body, two aspects of which I’ll note here. First, he defines the body (corpus) as “Obiectum ideae humanam mentem constituentis” (the object of the … Continue reading

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Brandom vs. the Idealists on “Causal Intermediaries”

Despite their many similarities, Brandom flags one point of disagreement with McDowell: I do not see that we need – either in epistemology or, more important, in semantics – to appeal to any intermediaries between perceptual facts and reports of … Continue reading

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McDowell’s “Absolute Idealism”

In “The Unboundedness of the Conceptual,” the second lecture that composes Mind and World, McDowell begins to sketch a constructive alternative to both the Myth of the Given and the frictionless-spinning of coherentism. He suggests that, “although reality is independent of our … Continue reading

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Berkeley and Aquinas on Matter and Epistemological Realism

Does matter exist? Bishop Berkeley famously said, No, a thesis which has earned him a reputation as a brilliant crank (emphasis on “crank”). Here’s his argument: Wood, stones, fire, water, flesh, iron, and the like things, which I name and … Continue reading

Posted in Aristotle, Being and beings, Descartes, Epistemology, George Berkeley, Idealism, John Locke, John O'Callaghan, Matter, Metaphysics, Mind and World, Plato, Thomas Aquinas | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment