Tag Archives: Hume

Newman as Transcendental Idealist?

Here’s a thought: what if Newman’s distinction in the Grammar between “notions” and “things” was basically akin to Kant’s distinction between sensibility and cognition? Kant said that intuitions without concepts are blind, and that concepts without intuitions are empty; Newman insisted … Continue reading

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Berkeley and Pascal Read Kant’s Transcendental Aesthetic

Kant famously argues that space and time do not belong to objects perceived, but rather are transcendental conditions for the perception of any object. He begins by noting, “That in which alone the sensations can be posited and ordered in a … Continue reading

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Hume’s Lockean misstep

A key step in Hume’s argument against the rationality of induction is the following: “It is agreed on all hands that there is no known connection between the sensible qualities and the secret powers,” “on which the influence of these … Continue reading

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Buddhist skepticism

Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan argues that one unifying conviction of the six Brahmanical darsanas, the “orthodox systems” of classical Hindu thought, was an opposition to “the skepticism of the Buddhists” (Sourcebook in Indian Philosophy, 354). What does that mean, exactly? Well, consider this … Continue reading

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