Tag Archives: Chesterton

On Achieving Disagreement

In After Strange Gods, Eliot takes a leaf from Newman’s book: “In our time, controversy seems to me, on really fundamental matters, to be futile. It can only usefully be practised where there is common understanding. It requires common assumptions; and … Continue reading

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Chesterton on Newman and the Oxford Movement

“Newman took down the iron sword of dogma to parry a blow not yet delivered, that was coming from the club of Darwin. For this reason no one can understand tradition, or even history, who has not some tenderness for … Continue reading

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Changing to stay the same

A justly famous paragraph: It is indeed sometimes said that the stream is clearest near the spring. Whatever use may fairly be made of this image, it does not apply to the history of a philosophy or belief, which on … Continue reading

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Creedal complexity

The greater the variation and pluriformity of expression and entailment an idea admits, Newman insists, the more exactly it might be thought to approximate the thing for which it stands: As views of a material object may be taken from … Continue reading

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Chesterton’s Genealogy of Modernity

“Pagan antiquity was the age of status; Christian mediaevalism was the age of vows; and skeptical modernity has been the age of contracts; or rather has tried to be, and has failed” (“The Story of the Vow,” in The Superstition … Continue reading

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