Category Archives: Wittgenstein

McDowell’s “Absolute Idealism”

In “The Unboundedness of the Conceptual,” the second lecture that composes Mind and World, McDowell begins to sketch a constructive alternative to both the Myth of the Given and the frictionless-spinning of coherentism. He suggests that, “although reality is independent of our … Continue reading

Posted in Coherentism, Empiricism, Epistemology, George Berkeley, Hegel, Idealism, Immanuel Kant, John Locke, John McDowell, Wittgenstein | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

McDowell, “Mind and World” — Concepts and Intuitions

At the outset of the first lecture that composes Mind and World, McDowell writes that his “overall topic…in these lectures is the way concepts mediate the relation between minds and the world” (3). He suggests that the way to do this is … Continue reading

Posted in Coherentism, Donald Davidson, Empiricism, Immanuel Kant, John McDowell, Private Language, Wittgenstein | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Thought’s Traction

Consider these quotations from three philosophers you probably aren’t inclined to group together: The light dove, cleaving the air in her free flight, and feeling its resistance, might imagine that its flight would be still easier in empty space. It … Continue reading

Posted in Anselm, Empiricism, Immanuel Kant, Metaphysics, Plato, Thomas Aquinas, Wittgenstein | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Newman scoops Wittgenstein, Cavell, and Hauerwas

To make professions is to play with edged tools, unless we attend to what we are saying. Words have a meaning, whether we mean that meaning or not; and they are imputed to us in their real meaning, when our … Continue reading

Posted in Discipleship, John Henry Newman, Language, Meaning, Stanley Cavell, Stanley Hauerwas, Wittgenstein | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment