Category Archives: Kant

Barthian Shankara

Early in his commentary (bhasya) on the Brahma Sutras of Badarayana, Shankaracarya, the greatest sage of the Advaita Vedanta, offers a theory about the Brahman-world relation, and our knowledge of it. The second of 555 sutras reads as follows: “(Brahman is that) from which … Continue reading

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Kantian Newman

In chapter five of his Apologia, Newman writes, If I looked into a mirror, and did not see my face, I should have the sort of feeling which actually comes upon me, when I look into this living busy world, and … Continue reading

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Freedom and Necessity in Pascal, Leibniz, and Kant

A Leitmotiv of the Pensees is Pascal’s Augustinian reflections on the conversion of the nations as a providential fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Late in the work, he takes up this theme to argue that the Church outdoes the pagan philosophers, … Continue reading

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Berkeley and Pascal Read Kant’s Transcendental Aesthetic

Kant famously argues that space and time do not belong to objects perceived, but rather are transcendental conditions for the perception of any object. He begins by noting, “That in which alone the sensations can be posited and ordered in a … Continue reading

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“Is there an absolute duty to God?”

This is “Problem II” in Fear and Trembling, and it takes its inspiration from Kant’s notion that a divine command overriding the obligations of ethics is a logical impossibility: one would always be more justified in doubting the supposed divine … Continue reading

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The teleological suspension of the ethical

“Faith,” writes K., “begins precisely where thinking leaves off” (p. 46). “The ethical as such is the universal…It rests immanently in itself, has nothing outside itself that is its telos, but is itself the telos for everything outside itself…the single … Continue reading

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