Category Archives: Ecclesiology

Protestant Churches as Ecclesial Communities

An Anglican friend with Reformed sympathies recently suggested to me that Roman Catholicism’s claims to a distinctive degree of church unity are deceptive: after all, Jesuits and Dominicans and Franciscans surely disagree with each other as much as do Presbyterians and … Continue reading

Posted in Ecclesial Communities, Ecclesiology, Ecumenism, Episcopacy, Eucharist, Prophetical Office of the Church, Protestantism, Sacraments, Threefold Office | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

The Dispensation of Paganism

That’s Newman’s expression for “the dealings of God with those to whom He did not vouchsafe a written revelation” (from Arians of the Fourth Century, in The Genius of Newman, 178). Newman finds a type of this dispensation “in the history of Balaam … Continue reading

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How can I understand, unless someone guides me?

In Development 1.3.5, Newman draws an inference: “If the Christian doctrine, as originally taught, admits of true and important developments, as was argued in the foregoing Section, this is a strong antecedent argument in favour of a provision in the Dispensation for … Continue reading

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Aquinas vs. Newman on doctrinal development

In discussing whether the articles of faith “creverint secundum temporum successionem,” Thomas considers the following objection: Sicut per apostolos ad nos fides Christi pervenit, ita etiam in veteri testamento per priores patres ad posteriores devenit cognitio fidei, secundum illud Deut. … Continue reading

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Priestly Authority

Hus, Wycliffe, or Luther were not the first to interpret the priesthood as a bid to monopolize the graces given to all the elect. Nor were Machiavelli and Spinoza the first to interpret Israel’s polity in secular terms. No, all of … Continue reading

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Negotiating Dual Citizenship

The thesis of The Mighty and the Almighty: “Central to a Christian theological account of the state is an understanding of the duality of state authority mediating divine authority and an aunderstanding of the duality of Christians being under the … Continue reading

Posted in Augustine, Church, Church and State, Ecclesiology, Eschatology, Politics, Wolterstorf | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Wolterstorff on Liberal Democracy and Virtue

In The Mighty and the Almighty, Wolterstorff identifies three possible forms of state governance, arguing vehemently for the first, tentatively endorsing the second, and flatly rejecting the third. They are as follows: 1) curbing injustice (codifying criminal law and maintaining a … Continue reading

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