Category Archives: David B. Hart

Ramanuja, Aurobindo, and Hart on the One and the Many

Shankara is a famous advocate for a fully monist interpretation of the Upanishads and the Vedanta philosophy that developed from it. For instance: “The difference between the individual self and the highest Lord is owing to wrong knowledge only” (1.3.19,Sourcebook of Indian Philosophy, 515). … Continue reading

Posted in David B. Hart, David Hart, Hinduism, Ramanuja, Sarvapelli Radhakrishnan, Shankara, The One and the Many, Trinity, Upanishads | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Romans 9-11 in Outline

Rom 9:1-5 – Paul laments the unbelief of Israel, notwithstanding her many spiritual blessings (cf. Rom 3:1-4). Rom 9:6-13 – Israel’s unbelief does not frustrate the “word of God,” b/c “they are not all Israel, which are of Israel” (9:6); … Continue reading

Posted in David B. Hart, David Hart, Election, Israel, Paul, Romans, Salvaton, Soteriology, St. Paul | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Eschatology and Anthropology

There’s a lively discussion at the moment about the possibility — or indeed, the inevitability — of universal salvation. TJ White’s treatment of Christ’s descent into hell in his recent Incarnate Lord includes some helpful discussion of universalism that clearly locates what I … Continue reading

Posted in David B. Hart, Doctrine of Creation, Eschatology, Eternity, Gregory of Nyssa, Human nature, Summa Theologiae, Thomas Aquinas | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Seven markers of modernism

Sass catalogs seven traits that compose the ideal type of modernist sensibility (enfolding “postmodernism” as an offspring or sibling of modernism): 1. Avant-Gardism: “alienation from tradition” (30). As theorized by MacIntyre, this is of course fundamental to the “Enlightenment project” … Continue reading

Posted in Alasdair MacIntyre, David B. Hart, Madness and Modernism, Modernity, Nietzsche, Paul Griffiths, Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Hart on creation sounds like Jenson

I think of these two as engaged in a monumental struggle over the mechanics of the Trinity, but on the ground, they sound remarkably alike. Take Hart on creation: “Creation is thus without foundations; it attends God, possessing no essence … Continue reading

Posted in Being and beings, Creation, David B. Hart, Holy Trinity, Robert Jenson, Uncategorized | Tagged | Leave a comment