Newman scoops Wittgenstein, Cavell, and Hauerwas

To make professions is to play with edged tools, unless we attend to what we are saying. Words have a meaning, whether we mean that meaning or not; and they are imputed to us in their real meaning, when our not meaning it is our own fault…[one] cannot frame a language for himself

It is not an easy thing to learn that new language which Christ has brought us. He has interpreted all things for us in a new way…Try to learn this language. Do not get it by rote, or speak it as a thing of course. Try to understand what you say. (“Unreal Words,” in The Genius of Newman, 164, 166)

“Can there be a private language?” Newman gives Wittgenstein’s answer — No! “Must we mean what we say?” Newman gives Cavell’s answer: Yes! “How should we think of Christian discipleship?” Newman gives Hauerwas’s answer: As a language we learn by practicing.

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This entry was posted in Discipleship, John Henry Newman, Language, Meaning, Stanley Cavell, Stanley Hauerwas, Wittgenstein and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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