Monthly Archives: April 2013

The “futurist” aesthetic as the end of habit

“According to the futurist/formalist view, art’s essential role was to overcome the numbing of perception that accompanies the automatizing of actions frequently performed. (In order to to do this, it seems necessary to destroy, not memory itself, but all the … Continue reading

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Seven markers of modernism

Sass catalogs seven traits that compose the ideal type of modernist sensibility (enfolding “postmodernism” as an offspring or sibling of modernism): 1. Avant-Gardism: “alienation from tradition” (30). As theorized by MacIntyre, this is of course fundamental to the “Enlightenment project” … Continue reading

Posted in Alasdair MacIntyre, David B. Hart, Madness and Modernism, Modernity, Nietzsche, Paul Griffiths, Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Madness as “hyperreflexivity”

Sass suggests that the phenomenology of madness should take its bearings from the concept of “hyperreflexivity”: the madman layers and categorizes his experiences in self-reflection so delicate and dense that it obscures the ordinary course of life. This is an … Continue reading

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The Thesis of “Madness and Modernism”

“What if madness were to involve not an escape from but an exacerbation of that thoroughgoing illness Dostoevksky imagined [viz. “too much consciousness”]? What if madness, in at least some of its forms, were to derive from a heightening rather … Continue reading

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